DEFINITION of 'Investopedia'

Investopedia is one of the best-known sources of financial information on the Internet. The website serves as a resource for investors, consumers, financial professionals, and students who seek guidance or information on various topics.

The site publishes articles on investments, insurance, retirement, estate and college planning, consumer debt, and an assortment of other educational material.

BREAKING DOWN 'Investopedia'

Although Investopedia started as a source for financial terms, it has expanded to bring timely stock analysis and financial news to users. New investors can open a free stock or forex simulator account before entering the market with real funds. Most recently, Investopedia launched its Advisor Insights network, which connects users with Investopedia's network of Financial Advisors to answer any and all finance questions. 

The online website was founded in 1999 by two graduates of the University of Alberta in Canada, Cory Janssen and Cory Wagner. The college classmates enlisted the help of a third school mate, Tom Hendrickson, to run the company. The group later sold Investopedia to Forbes Publishing in 2007.

Growth of the Company

When ValueClick bought Investopedia in 2010 for $42 million, the website brought in approximately $10 million in annual revenue and 2.2 million visitors per month. IAC purchased the website in late 2013. As part of IAC, Investopedia joined other well-known Web properties such as About.com, Ask.com and Dictionary.com in the company's lineup. As of 2016, the CEO of Investopedia is David Siegel. He has nearly 20 years of experience running media companies. Under Siegel's leadership, Investopedia has increased its unique visitors to 20 million per month, nearly 10 times as many as in 2010. Investopedia has offices in New York and Edmonton, Alberta.

Stock Simulator

One of the major online products of Investopedia is its Stock Simulator. The program gives users $100,000 in virtual money to purchase stocks, securities and other investments in real-time scenarios. The simulator gives potential traders a taste of what it is like to try to make money on investments before spending actual money on the stock market. The game allows enthusiasts to challenge each other to see who performs better over time. This portion of Investopedia requires registration through an email address or Facebook.

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