DEFINITION of 'Japan Inc.'

A nickname for the corporate world of Japan that came about during the 1980s boom, when Western business people saw how closely the Japanese government worked with its nation's business sector.

BREAKING DOWN 'Japan Inc.'

The high degree of collusion between Japan's corporate and political sectors led to corruption throughout the system and contributed to the downfall of the overvalued Nikkei.

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