DEFINITION of 'K'

A Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that the stock has no voting rights.

BREAKING DOWN 'K'

Nasdaq-listed securities have four or five characters. If a fifth letter appears, it identifies the issue as other than a single issue of common stock or capital stock.

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