Loading the player...

What is 'Market'

A market is a medium that allows buyers and sellers of a specific good or service to interact in order to facilitate an exchange. This type of market may either be a physical marketplace where people come together to exchange goods and services in person, as in a bazaar or shopping center, or a virtual market wherein buyers and sellers do not interact, as in an online market. Market can also refer to the general market where securities are traded. This form of the term may also refer to specific securities markets and may take place in person or online. The term "market" can also refer to people with the desire and ability to buy a specific product or service.

BREAKING DOWN 'Market'

Markets may come in the form of physical locations where transactions are made, which may exist as anything from thrift or boutique stores selling individual items to wholesale markets selling goods to other distributors. Yet, markets do not necessarily need to be a physical meeting place. Internet-based stores and auction sites, for example, are all markets in which transactions can take place entirely online and where the two parties do not ever need to physically meet. Technically speaking, a market is any medium through which two or more parties can engage in an economic transaction, even those that do not necessarily need to involve money. A market transaction may involve goods, services, information, currency or any combination of these things passing from one party to another in exchange for one of these or another combination.

How Markets Work

Markets establish the going rates for goods and other services, which sellers determine by creating supply and which buyers determine by creating demand. A market is a focal center for the distribution of goods and resources within a society, though they are not always deliberately created. Markets may emerge organically or as a means of enabling ownership rights over goods, services and information. When on a national or other more specific regional level, markets may often be categorized as “developed” markets or “developing” markets, depending on many factors including income levels and the nation or region’s openness to foreign trade.

Markets vary widely for a number of reasons, including the kinds of products sold, location, duration, size and constituency of the customer base, size, legality and many other factors. For example, the term black market refers to an illegal market. Yet, like markets in general, a black market can be a physical market where illegal goods are traded in person or a virtual market where illegal goods are traded with relative anonymity. A variation on this is a grey market, which is an unauthorized or unofficial locus of trade through channels that are otherwise legal.

Because a market may often be bound to a geographic region, nation or state, even when the market in question is not physical, it is subject to rules and regulations set by a regional or other governing body that determines the market’s nature. This may be the case when the regulation is as wide-reaching and as widely recognized as an international trade agreement (such as the North American Free Trade Agreement or the European Union) or as local and temporary as a pop-up street market where vendors self-regulate through market forces.

The theoretical optimally functioning market is one experiencing perfect competition, a condition in which no individual party or other entity within the market is powerful enough to determine the price of a particular good or service. In addition, though only two parties are needed to make a trade, at minimum a third party is needed in order to introduce an element of competition and bring balance to the market. As such, a market in a state of perfect competition, among other things, is necessarily characterized by a high number of active buyers and sellers.

Securities Markets

The most common types of securities markets are stock markets, bond markets, currency markets (called foreign exchange markets or forex), money markets and futures markets. Many of these markets manifest themselves in the form of exchanges. In the case of the stock market, there are a variety of exchanges around the world, the most popular of which are the New York Stock Exchange, NASDAQ, the United Kingdom's London Stock Exchange, Japan’s Tokyo Stock Exchange, China’s Shanghai Stock Exchange, the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, Euronext, China’s Shenzen Stock Exchange, Canada’s TMX Group and Germany’s Deutsche Börse.

Generally speaking, the existence and prevalence of these various forms of securities markets are characteristics of a free market economy.

A Market as a Group of People

This use of “market” can refer to a constituency with interest in a product or service that is of any size and exists on any social level. For example, it can be used in reference to something as local as “the Brooklyn housing market” or as broad as “the global diamond market.”

RELATED TERMS
  1. Equity Market

    An equity market is a market in which shares are issued and traded, ...
  2. Foreign Exchange

    Foreign exchange is the conversion of one currency into another ...
  3. Futures Exchange

    A futures exchange is a central marketplace, physical or electronic, ...
  4. Medium Of Exchange

    A medium of exchange is an intermediary instrument, such as currency, ...
  5. Financial Market

    A financial market is a broad term describing any marketplace ...
  6. Spot Market

    A spot market is where trades are made for immediate delivery.
Related Articles
  1. Insights

    The NYSE and Nasdaq: How They Work

    Learn some of the important differences in the way these exchanges operate and the securities that trade on them.
  2. Investing

    Financial markets: Capital vs. Money Markets

    There are several key differences between capital markets and money markets as components of financial markets. Check out the similarities and differences between the two markets.
  3. Tech

    190 Cryptocurrency Exchanges: So How to Choose

    With the plethora of digital currency exchanges, how can an investor choose the right one?
  4. Investing

    The Ins And Outs of Seller-Financed Real Estate Deals

    There's more than one way to buy or sell a house. Seller financing presents yet another unique option.
  5. Trading

    The Currency Market Information Edge

    Unique features of the forex market may allow larger players to get a jump on smaller ones.
  6. Investing

    Currency Futures: An Introduction

    Find out why forex market is not the only way for investors and traders to participate in foreign exchange.
  7. Insights

    The World's Top Financial Cities

    These cities are the heart of the world's financial activity.
  8. Insights

    How Currency Works

    Currency offers key advantages over economies based on direct trade, including a broader market for sellers' goods and services and transport ease.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What does it mean when my broker says that shares are for auction?

    An auction market is one in which stock buyers enter competitive bids and stock sellers enter competitive offers at the same ... Read Answer >>
  2. If everyone is selling in a bear market, does your broker have to buy your shares ...

    Learn about who the counterparty to your trades is, and how your broker functions during a market sell off. Read Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between trading currency futures and spot FX?

    The main difference between currency futures and spot FX is when the physical exchange of the currency pair takes place. Read Answer >>
  4. How are share prices set?

    Different factors determine an initial share price, from an investment bank's valuation during an IPO to supply and demand ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Risk Tolerance

    Risk tolerance is the degree of variability in investment returns that an individual is willing to withstand.
  2. Diversification

    Diversification is the strategy of investing in a variety of securities in order to lower the risk involved with putting ...
  3. Initial Coin Offering (ICO)

    An Initial Coin Offering (ICO) is an unregulated means by which funds are raised for a new cryptocurrency venture.
  4. Federal Funds Rate

    The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve ...
  5. Ethereum

    Ethereum is a decentralized software platform that enables SmartContracts and Distributed Applications (ĐApps) to be built ...
  6. Perfect Competition

    Pure or perfect competition is a theoretical market structure in which a number of criteria such as perfect information and ...
Trading Center