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DEFINITION of 'Market Is Up'

A common phrase meaning the stock market (or a major market index) is trading higher than at some specific point in the past. The market could be up in comparison to the previous day's closing level, last month's closing level or the closing level three years ago. The opposite phrase is the "market is down" or the "market is off."

BREAKING DOWN 'Market Is Up'

A number of factors can cause the market to be up or down, such as companies' earnings announcements, political events and natural disasters. In daily news reports, the market being referenced is often the Dow Jones Industrial Average, or the S&P 500. The phrase "the market is up" or "the market is down" can also be used to refer to the real estate market, the futures market, the automobile market or just about any other type of market.

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