What is a 'Married Put'

A married put is similar to an insurance policy for investors. It is an options trading strategy where an investor, holding a long position in a stock, purchases an at-the-money put option on the same stock to protect against depreciation in the stock's price. 

BREAKING DOWN 'Married Put'

A married put is also known as a synthetic long call and should not be confused with selling a covered put.

The married put is a bullish strategy used when the investor is concerned about potential near-term uncertainties in the stock. By owning the stock with a protective put option, the investor still receives the benefits of stock ownership, such as receiving dividends and having the right to vote. In contrast, just owning a call option, while equally as bullish as owning the stock, does not confer the same benefits of stock ownership. 

A married put provides insurance when paired with holding the underlying stock.

Both a married put and a long call have the same unlimited profit potential, as there is no ceiling on the price appreciation of the underlying stock. However, profit is always lower than it would be for just owning the stock, decreased by the cost or premium of the put option purchased. Reaching breakeven for the strategy occurs when the underlying stock rises by the amount of the options premium paid. Anything above that amount is profit.

The benefit is there is now a floor under the stock limiting downside risk. The floor is the difference between the price of the underlying stock, at the time of the purchase of the married put, and the strike price of the put. Put another way, at the time of the purchase of the option, if the underlying stock traded exactly at the strike price, the loss for the strategy is capped at exactly the price paid for the option.

When to Use a Married Put

Rather than a profit-making strategy, a married put is a capital preserving strategy. Indeed, the cost of the put portion of the strategy becomes a built-in cost. The put price reduces the profitability of the strategy, assuming the underlying stock moves higher, by the cost of the option. Therefore, investors should use a married put as an insurance policy against near-term uncertainty in an otherwise bullish stock, or as protection against an unforeseen price breakdown

Newer investors benefit from knowing that their losses in the stock are limited. This can give them confidence as they learn more about different investing strategies. Of course, this protection comes at a cost, which includes the price of the option, commissions, and possibly other fees.

See "Use Married Puts To Protect Your Portfolio" for more.

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