What is the 'Mill Levy '

The mill levy is the assessed property tax rate used by local governments and other jurisdictions to raise revenue in order to cover annual expenses. The mill levy is calculated by determining how much revenue each taxing jurisdiction will need for the upcoming year, then dividing that projection by the total value of the property within the area, and finally adding up the rate from each jurisdiction to get the mill levy for the entire area.

BREAKING DOWN 'Mill Levy '

There can be several taxing authorities in one region, which could include school, county and city districts. As an example, suppose the entire property value in the area is $1 billion and the school district needs $100 million in revenue, the county needs $10 million and the city needs $50 million. The tax levy for the school district would be $100 million divided by $1 billion or 0.10. The tax levy for the county would be 0.01 (10 million/1 billion), and the tax levy for the city would be 0.05 (50 million/1 billion). Add all the tax levies up to get the mill levy of 0.16 or 160 mills. One mill = 0.001.

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