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DEFINITION of 'Mutual-Fund Advisory Program'

A mutual fund advisory program is a portfolio of mutual funds that are selected to match a pre-set asset allocation. The pre-set asset allocation model based on the investor's objectives and offered in a single investment account together with the services of a professional investment advisor. Typically, investors will not be charged separate transaction fees, but periodic (i.e. monthly/quarterly/yearly) asset-management fees based on the average value of assets held within the account. Also known as a "mutual fund wrap."

BREAKING DOWN 'Mutual-Fund Advisory Program'

Unlike managed accounts where the financial advisor has full discretion over any investment decisions, mutual-fund advisory programs allow the investor to work with the advisor in developing the optimal asset-allocation strategy. The advisor will help determine which model is best based on various factors such as the investor's goals, risk tolerance, time horizon and income, while providing ongoing guidance and investment support.

Benefits of Mutual-Fund Advisory Programs

Investors in mutual-fund advisory programs can benefit from lower trading costs and a professionally advised portfolio based on their personalized investing interests. The annual wrap fee is usually tiered based on assets in the program. It can range from approximately 0.25% to 3% depending on the program and is in addition to the annual operating fees charged by the funds in the portfolio.

Robo-Advisors

Mutual-fund advisory programs can be a good investment option for investors. However, the increasing presence of robo advisors has created competition for these programs. As a result, many full-service brokerage firms have begun to offer robo-advisor alternatives for their customers. Schwab’s Intelligent Portfolios are one example.

Robo-advisor platforms typically provide the same investment profiling and portfolio building services. They offer some additional benefits in that the service is automated, fees can be lower and investment minimums are usually lower. With the lower minimum investments, robo advice wrap programs can be offered to investors seeking to build a managed portfolio with only $5,000. Currently most robo advice wrap programs use exchange-traded funds (ETFs) rather than mutual funds.

Example of a Mutual-Fund Advisory Program

UBS offers PACE (Personalized Asset Consulting and Evaluation), a fee-based, nondiscretionary mutual fund advisory program utilizing a disciplined approach to selecting and building a diversified portfolio of mutual funds. Here's how PACE works:

  • A financial advisor creates an investor profile that contains information about your investing goals, time frames and comfort level with risk.
  • You and your financial advisor select from a list of mutual funds
  • You may choose PACE Multi Advisor (a broad range of no-load or load-waved mutual funds at net asset value) or PACE Select Advisors (a refined list of leading no-load funds brought to you by UBS Global Asset Management)
  • Your mutual funds will be continually monitored by UBS research professionals
  • You'll receive monthly statements
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