What is a 'Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL'

A non-interest-bearing current liability (NIBCL) is a category of debt entered on the liabilities side of a balance sheet under current liabilities. While a NIBCL is a form of debt, representing a sum of money that the company owes and must pay within one year, it does not require interest payments.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL'

Non-interest-bearing current liabilities are straightforward. Unlike interest-bearing current liabilities such as working capital loans or the current portion (maturing in less than one year) of long-term debt, the non-interest-bearing ones are just that - not subject to interest on the 'debt' that a company owes.

Example of a Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability

The Kroger Co. lists the following under Current Liabilities on its FY2017 balance sheet: 1) current portion of long-term debt including obligations under capital leases and financing obligations; 2) trade accounts payable; 3) accrued salaries and wages; 4) deferred income taxes; and 5) other current liabilities. Items 2, 3 and 4 are NIBCL. There may or may not be interest-bearing items under "other current liabilities."  Typically, "other" is not broken down in the Notes to the Financial Statements.

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