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What are 'Quick Assets'

Quick assets refer to assets owned by a company with a commercial or exchange value that can easily be converted into cash or that is already in a cash form. Quick assets are the highly liquid assets held by a company, including marketable securities and accounts receivable. Companies use quick assets to calculate certain financial ratios that are used in decision making, including the quick ratio.

BREAKING DOWN 'Quick Assets'

Unlike any other types of assets, quick assets represent economic resources that can be turned into cash in a relatively short period of time without a significant loss of value. Cash and cash equivalents are the most liquid current assets items included in quick assets, while marketable securities and accounts receivable are also quick assets. Quick assets exclude inventories, because it may take more time for a company to convert them into cash.

Composition of Quick Assets

Companies typically keep some portion of their quick assets in the form of cash and marketable securities as a buffer to satisfy their immediate operating, investing or financing needs. A company that has a low cash balance in its quick assets may satisfy its needs for liquidity by tapping into its available lines of credit. Depending on the nature of a business and the industry in which it operates, a substantial portion of its quick assets may be tied to accounts receivable. For example, companies that sell products and services to corporate clients may have large account receivable balances, while retail companies that sell products to individual consumers may have negligible accounts receivable on their balance sheets.

Usefulness of Quick Assets

Analysts most often use quick assets to assess a company's ability to satisfy its immediate bills and obligations that are due within a year. The total amount of quick assets is used in the quick ratio, sometimes referred to as the acid test, which is a financial ratio that divides the sum of a company's cash, marketable securities and accounts receivable by its current liabilities. This ratio allows investment professionals to determine whether a company can meet its financial obligations if its revenues or cash collections happen to slow down. The quick ratio is contrasted against the current ratio, which is equal to a company's total current assets, including its inventories, divided by its current liabilities. The quick ratio represents a more stringent test for the liquidity of a company in comparison to the current ratio.

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