What Is a Red Chip?

A red-chip company does most of its business in China, and the Chinese government has a considerable stake in the firm. However, it is incorporated outside mainland China and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Red-chip stocks are expected to maintain the filing and reporting requirements of the Hong Kong exchange. That makes them an important outlet for foreign investors who wish to participate in the rapid growth of the Chinese economy.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • A red-chip company does most of its business in China, and the Chinese government has a considerable stake in the firm.
  • Red chip firms are incorporated outside mainland China and listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.
  • Red chips take their name from China's red flag, and the name reflects the Chinese government's partial ownership of the company.
  • Red-chip firms are not necessarily large or well-known.

Understanding Red Chips

Although red chips are listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, they should not be confused with H-shares. H-shares are shares of companies that are incorporated in mainland China but traded on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange or another foreign exchange. Red chips, on the other hand, must be incorporated outside mainland China.

The name "red chip" is similar to "blue chip," but the two terms should not be confused. Any large, well-known, and financially stable company can be referred to as a blue chip. However, a key distinguishing feature of a red-chip stock is a sizable Chinese government stake in the company. Red chips take their name from China's red flag, and the name reflects the Chinese government's partial ownership of the company. Red-chip firms are not necessarily large or well-known.

A red chip is not the Chinese version of a blue chip.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Red Chips

Red-chip stocks enjoy a combination of impressive advantages, but also have a few drawbacks. They offer access to the growing Chinese market, but their international incorporation and listing in Hong Kong ensure adherence to developed market financial reporting standards. They also combine easy access for foreign investors and the discipline of global financial markets with implicit Chinese government backing. Government support guarantees a relatively friendly regulatory regime and access to capital in a crisis. However, it also means that red chips may pursue goals other than profit maximization. Like all companies, red chips work for the shareholders. However, the largest shareholders for red chips are often Chinese state-owned enterprises. In theory, other shareholders might see profits placed behind social, environmental, and other political goals.

Requirements for Red Chips

According to FTSE Russell, there are four main criteria for a firm to be classified as a red chip:

  • Chinese government-affiliated organizations must own at least 35% of the company. These organizations may include the government of the People's Republic of China, Chinese provincial governments, municipal governments in China, and Chinese state-owned enterprises.
  • More than 55% of the firm's revenue must come from the People's Republic of China, or the firm must have over 55% of its assets in China.
  • The firm must be incorporated outside of mainland China.
  • The company's stock must be listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.

It should be noted that firms are no longer considered red chip if government ownership drops below 25%. If both Chinese assets and Chinese revenue fall below 45%, the firm will also lose the red chip designation.

Example of a Red Chip

China Mobile was the largest red-chip company as of December 2019, with a market capitalization of more than 1.2 trillion Hong Kong dollars (over 150 billion U.S. dollars). The firm was incorporated in Hong Kong in 1997, so it is incorporated outside of mainland China. The firm's shares are listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, which is also required for red-chip stocks. In December 2018, 72.72% of the company was held by China Mobile Communications Group Co., Ltd., which is a Chinese state-owned enterprise.