What is a 'Registered Bond'

A registered bond is a bond whose owner is registered with the bond's issuer. The owner's name and contact information is recorded and kept on file with the company, allowing it to pay the bond's coupon payment to the appropriate person. If the bond is in physical form, the owner's name is printed on the certificate. Most registered bonds are now tracked electronically, using computers to record owners' information.

BREAKING DOWN 'Registered Bond'

Transferring the ownership of a registered bond depends on the way the bond is held. Certificate bonds must be endorsed by the owner before the transfer is complete, while electronic bonds simply need to have the change of information phoned, mailed or faxed to the company.

Registered bonds are the opposite of bearer bonds, which contain no information on the owner. Bearer bonds will pay a coupon or the principal to whoever holds the physical certificate.

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