DEFINITION of 'Renewable Term'

A clause in a term insurance contract that allows the beneficiary to extend the coverage term for a set period of time without having to requalify for coverage. A renewable term is contingent on premium payments being up to date, as well as a renewal premium being paid by the beneficiary.

BREAKING DOWN 'Renewable Term'

In the context of a life insurance contract, having a renewable term clause would be beneficial, as future health circumstances are unpredictable. Although the initial premiums are likely to be higher than those of a life insurance contract without a renewable term clause (the insurance company must be compensated for this increase in risk), buying this type of insurance is often in the beneficiary's best interest.

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