What is the 'Securities And Exchange Board Of India - SEBI'

The Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) is the designated regulatory body for the finance and investment markets in India. The board plays a vital role in maintaining stable and efficient financial and investment markets by creating and enforcing effective regulation in India's financial marketplace. India's SEBI is similar to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

BREAKING DOWN 'Securities And Exchange Board Of India - SEBI'

The SEBI was established in 1988 but was only given regulatory powers on April 12, 1992, through the Securities and Exchange Board of India Act, 1992. It plays a key role in ensuring the stability of the financial markets in India, by attracting foreign investors and protecting Indian investors. SEBI was built by the government of India. Its headquarters is located at the Bandra Kurla Complex Business District found in Mumbai. It also has northern, eastern, southern and western regional offices.

SEBI's management is composed of its own members. Its management team consists of a chairman nominated by the Union Government of India, two members who are officers from the Union Finance Ministry, one member from the Reserve Bank of India and five other members who are also nominated by the Union Government of India.

Functions and Responsibilities

SEBI's Preamble describes in detail the functions and powers of the board. Its Preamble states that SEBI must "protect the interests of investors in securities and to promote the development of, and to regulate the securities market and for matters connected there with or incidental there to." In this light, as a board, SEBI must be responsive and proactive to the needs and interest of the groups that constitute India's financial and investment markets: the investors, the market intermediaries and the issuers of securities.

SEBI is allowed to approve by-laws of stock exchanges. It is its job to require the stock exchange to follow its by-laws. SEBI also inspects the books of accounts of financial intermediaries and asks for regular returns from recognized stock exchanges. SEBI's role covers compelling particular companies to list their shares in stock exchanges. Aside from these, SEBI is tasked to manage the registration of brokers.

Ultimately, the board has three powers: quasi-judicial, quasi-legislative and quasi-executive. SEBI has the right to draft regulations under its legislative capacity, conduct investigations and impose action under its executive function, and pass new rules and orders under its judicial capacity. Despite these powers, the results of SEBI's functions still have to go through the Securities Appellate Tribunal and the Supreme Court of India.

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