DEFINITION of 'SEC Form F-1'

SEC Form F-1 is a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) required for the registration of certain securities by foreign issuers. SEC Form F-1 is required to register securities issued by foreign issuers for which no other specialized form exists or is authorized.

BREAKING DOWN 'SEC Form F-1'

Form F-1, which is also known as a Registration Statement, is a requirement under the Securities Exchange Act of 1933. This act, often referred to as the "truth in securities" law, requires that these forms, providing essential facts, are filed to disclose important information upon registration of a company's securities. Form F-1 helps the SEC achieve the objectives of this act. Foreign issuers, with which domestic investors may be less familiar, are required to disclose significant information regarding securities offered to minimize or prevent fraud. The instructions for Form F-1 is extensive, but the bulk of the filing centers around summary information about the business, risk factors, management and compensation, financial statements and notes to the statements, material changes with respect to accounting in the financial statements, and details on the securities offering. Any amendments, or changes which have to be made by the foreign issuer are filed under Form F-1/A ("A" denotes amendment). After the foreign issuer's securities are issued, the company is required to file Form 20-F annually.

Example of Using SEC Form F-1

Shopify Inc., based in Ottawa, Canada, filed Form F-1 with the SEC on April 14, 2015, to offer Class A subordinate voting shares to U.S. investors. The F-1 begins with a prospectus summary then provides comprehensive sections on the business, management, executive compensation, related party transactions, principal shareholder, description of share capital, shares eligible for future sale, taxation, underwriting, expenses related to the offering, legal matters and identification of the auditors. Also salient to investors is information regarding industry and market data, dilution with the proposed offering, dividend policy and use of proceeds. Finally, management discussion and analysis (commonly referred to as MD&A) provides some details about the drivers of the company's revenues and profits.

Form S-1 versus Form F-1

Form S-1, also a Registration Statement required under the Securities Exchange Act of 1933 for new issuance of securities, must be filed by domestic corporations. Form F-1, as discussed, is for foreign corporations. The F-1 will contain additional specific and material information that is pertinent to the U.S. investors regarding the issuer's country and how the securities may be treated - e.g., taxation in a foreign jurisdiction, handling of legal matters, etc.

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