DEFINITION of 'Supplemental Security Income - SSI'

Supplemental Security Income is a federal program that provides additional income for older and disabled people with little to no income. This program provides participants with monthly cash distributions to help them meet their basic needs. SSI is different than Social Security retirement benefits.  

BREAKING DOWN 'Supplemental Security Income - SSI'

SSI is a type of safety net for U.S. citizens or nationals who cannot meet their basic financial needs because of their age or a disability. SSI Payments arrive on the first day of each month and can also include food stamps and Medicaid benefits.

There are very specific requirements a person must meet to become eligible for SSI. First, SSI candidates must be 65 or older, blind or disabled. Second, they must have limited income, limited resources and be a U.S. citizen or national. Finally, there are other small requirements they must meet, like residency in one of the 50 states, the District of Columbia or the Northern Mariana Islands.

In special cases, children under 18 may be considered disabled and earn SSI eligibility. For a child to qualify, the disability must result in severe functional limitations and can be expected to cause death or has lasted -- or is expected to last -- longer than 12 months.

Income Limit for SSI

The Federal Benefit Rate outlines both the SSI income limit for eligibility and the maximum monthly SSI payment. The FBR currently sets monthly payments at $750 for an individuals and $1,125 for couples, as of 2018. The FBR will increase annually in relation to the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment.

To become eligible for SSI, a person or couple's combined income cannot exceed the monthly SSI payment as outlined by the FBR. However, the Social Security Administration only counts portions of a person's income towards the income limit. For example, if a person earns money from working, only half of the amount earned each month in excess of the first $65 will count when determining eligibility. Therefore, it's important to contact the SSA regarding a person's specific income and eligibility.

Understanding State Supplements

Most states will add money to the federal SSI payments. This added money will increase both the allowed income level for eligibility as well as the amount of the monthly SSI payment. The amount of the supplement varies from state to state, but a person may receive between $10 and $400 per month from the state in which they reside. According to the SSA website, Arizona, Mississippi, North Dakota, West Virginia, and the Northern Mariana Islands do not offer a state supplement, meaning people in those states can only earn eligibility and payment based on the federal minimums the FBR outlined.

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