DEFINITION of 'Swap Bank'

A financial institution that acts as an intermediary for interest and currency swaps. The function of these intermediaries is to find counterparties for those who want to participate in swap agreements. The swap bank typically earns a slight premium for facilitating the swap.

BREAKING DOWN 'Swap Bank'

Generally speaking, companies do not directly approach other companies in an attempt to create swap agreements. Instead, swap banks coordinate the swap agreements for companies. In most cases, companies don't even know the identities of their swap counterparties.

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    Learn why parties enter into swap agreements to hedge their risks, and understand how the different legs of a swap agreement ... Read Answer >>
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    A rollercoaster swap is the name for a swap (the exchange of one security for another) with a notional principal that differs ... Read Answer >>
  3. Who is the counterparty of a derivative?

    Learn about the counterparty to a derivative contract, and how derivative swap agreements traded over the counter have counterparty ... Read Answer >>
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