DEFINITION of 'Thomas C. Schelling'

An American economist who won the 2005 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, along with Robert J. Aumann, for his research on conflict and cooperation via game theory. His research has been used in conflict resolution and war avoidance. Many of his research interests have been related to national security, energy and environmental policy, and ethical issues in public policy and business.

BREAKING DOWN 'Thomas C. Schelling'

Schelling was born in California in 1921. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard and taught at Yale and Harvard before becoming professor of economics at the University of Maryland. He has also worked for the White House and the RAND Corporation.

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