DEFINITION of 'Up/Down Gap Side-by-Side White Lines'

The side by side white lines pattern is a three-candle continuation pattern that occurs in candlestick charts.

BREAKING DOWN 'Up/Down Gap Side-by-Side White Lines'

The up gap side by side white lines is a bullish continuation pattern, where:

  1. The market is in an uptrend;
  2. The first candle is a white candle;
  3. The second candle opens above the close of the first candle (gap up);
  4. And, the third candle has a real body with the same length as the second candle with an open that’s at the same level or higher than the real body of the first candle.

The down gap side by side white lines is a bearish continuation pattern, where:

  1. The market is in a downtrend;
  2. The first candle is a black candle;
  3. The second candle is a white candle that opens below the close of the first candle (gap down);
  4. And, the third candle is a white candle with a real body that’s the same length as the second candle and opens at the same level or below the real body of the first candle.

The side by side white lines pattern is relatively accurate in predicting a continuation of the current trend, but is somewhat uncommon in the wild.

Traders should be sure to use other chart patterns or technical indicators to confirm the chart pattern to maximize their odds of success.

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