DEFINITION of 'Wallpaper'

The name given to stocks, bonds and other securities that have become worthless.

BREAKING DOWN 'Wallpaper'

The securities may have lost all monetary value because of bankruptcy or for other reasons. This term implies that because the certificates are worthless, may as well wallpaper your house with them. Former dotcom companies that went bankrupt are good examples of wallpaper stocks.

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RELATED FAQS
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    Shareholders may be entitled to a portion of the liquidated assets in the wake of a company bankruptcy, but the stock will ... Read Answer >>
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