Unemployment Rate by State

State-by-state differences can be substantial. Where's best and worst?

When it comes to unemployment, different parts of the United States are affected in distinct ways by the current economic circumstances. While the national unemployment rate provides a good indicator of how the country is doing as a whole, it can diverge considerably from what you might be facing in your home state. That's where the state unemployment rate comes in.

Key Takeaways

  • A state's individual unemployment rate makes it easier to determine how different parts of the U.S. are affected by the current economic circumstances.
  • A state's unemployment rate is measured as part of the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program, run by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).
  • The unemployment rate is calculated by dividing the number of unemployed individuals in a state by its total labor force.

How Are State Unemployment Rates Determined?

Each state's unemployment rate is measured as part of the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program, run by the BLS. These figures are updated monthly and are freely available on the BLS' website. LAUS also provides employment data for locations in the U.S. other than the 50 states, such as counties, metropolitan areas, and even several cities.

A state's unemployment rate is a good indicator of its economic strength. However, it's important to keep in mind how the rate is determined, so as not to make an incorrect assumption. The simplest way to calculate the unemployment rate is to divide the number of unemployed individuals in a state by its total labor force.

For example, say State A has a population of 600,000 residents and an unemployment rate of 5%, while State B has a population of 1,200,000 and an unemployment rate of 2.5%. Although State A has a higher unemployment rate, they each have the same number of unemployed workers (i.e, 300,000). So, while it would be correct to say that State A has been hit harder by unemployment, it would be wrong to assume State A has more jobless persons based solely on the rate.

Unemployment in Each State

Alabama Unemployment Rate

Alabama's economy features a wide variety of industries, with one of its most prominent being wood pulp production. However, it's the growing service sector that constitutes roughly three-fourths of the state's non-agricultural workforce. With its median family income falling short of the national average, Alabama is the seventh poorest state in the country.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 14.9 (Jan. 1983)
  • Historic Low: 2.7 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.7

Alaska Unemployment Rate

One of the last states to join the union, Alaska's abundant natural resources and beautiful geography combine for an economy primarily driven by fishing, tourism, and oil. The latter is especially important for the 49th state, with oil revenues providing almost 85% of its budget. Despite its size, Alaska has the lowest population density of any state in the country.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 11.9 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 4.7 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 4.7

Arizona Unemployment Rate

Home to the fifth most populous city in the nation, Arizona was once known best for its agricultural production and mining. These days, the Copper State's real estate/rental, government, and tourism industries represent its biggest economic sectors. That being said, Alabama's copper mines are still responsible for 65% of all U.S. copper, making it the sixth-largest copper producer globally.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 13.9 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.2 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 3.2

Arkansas Unemployment Rate

Arkansas is home to the headquarters of several major companies, including Walmart and Tyson Foods. Aerospace and defense, however, make up the Natural State's biggest export. Other prominent sectors include lumber, technology, and distribution and logistics.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 10.1 (March 1983)
  • Historic Low: 3.1 (March 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 3.2

California Unemployment Rate

Home to Hollywood and Silicon Valley, it may be surprising to learn that California's biggest leading industry is financial services, followed by manufacturing. It also includes the largest agricultural sector in the U.S. The Golden State has the highest population of any state in the country, originally resulting from a population boom caused by the Gold Rush.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.1 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 4.0 (July 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 4.3

Colorado Unemployment Rate

With its diverse landscape, ranging from massive mountains to breathtaking canyons, it's no surprise that tourism is one of Colorado's biggest industries. However, financial services actually represents the most profitable sector of the Centennial State's economy. This isn't that startling, given that the cost of doing business in Colorado is 2.4% under the national average.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 11.8 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.4 (May 2017)
  • Current unemployment: 3.5

Connecticut Unemployment Rate

Connecticut has a rather inventive history, with everything from submarines to lollipops getting their start in this state. While advanced manufacturing is in the Constitution State's blood, it also earned the "Insurance Capital of the World" title for a reason. As the birthplace of America's first insurance companies, it's unsurprising that financial services make up over one-fifth of its gross state product.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 11.4 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.0 (Aug. 2000)
  • Current unemployment: 4.2

Delaware Unemployment Rate

The first state in the union is host to a wide variety of industries, ranging from agriculture to education. The Diamond State may be best known for its contributions via chemical manufacturing, such as in the pharmaceuticals market. As is a trend in many states, however, Delaware's biggest industry is actually financial services.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 13.3 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.8 (May 1988)
  • Current unemployment: 4.5

District of Columbia Unemployment Rate

Although technically a city, the BLS still records a state unemployment rate for the District of Columbia. While it may come as little surprise that the U.S. capital's workforce is heavily represented in its government sector, the professional and business services industry has actually been the largest and fastest growing sector from 2019 to 2020. It also has the highest population density in the country, when compared to the 50 states.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 11.3 (March 1983)
  • Historic Low: 4.7 (June 1989)
  • Current unemployment: 5.7

Florida Unemployment Rate

The third most populous state in the country, Florida's tourism industry resulted in 122 million visitors in 2021. However, while the Sunshine State's beaches may be a beloved destination for vacationing families and students on spring break, Florida's economy features several other sectors. The manufacturing industry alone employs more than 317,000 people.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 13.9 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.4 (June 2006)
  • Current unemployment: 3.0

Georgia Unemployment Rate

Georgia's economy has a long history when it comes to agriculture. Originally heavily reliant on cotton, the Peach State is best known (despite the name) for its peanut production. One in seven Georgians works in agriculture, while the majority work in the service sector. Financial services is Georgia's most profitable industry.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 12.3 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.0 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 3.0

Hawaii Unemployment Rate

Hawaii is, to date, the last territory to become a U.S. state. The dominant income generator in the archipelago is a "visitor sector" that is itself comprised of several industries related to tourism. The biggest of these sectors is hospitality, representing a workforce of 89,400.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 22.4 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 1.9 (Nov. 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 4.2

Idaho Unemployment Rate

Although Idaho has long been known as a major agricultural center, its economy is rather diverse. The Gem State became prominent following the California Gold Rush, which led to the development of a robust mining industry. Key sectors in its modern economy range from manufacturing, making up 6% of the state's workforce, to tourism, which employs over 45,800 people.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 11.8 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.5 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.5

Illinois Unemployment Rate

With the fifth highest GDP in the U.S., it's no surprise that 38 Fortune 500 companies are based in Illinois. The healthcare sector employs the most people in the Prairie State, although financial services pulls in the highest profits.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 17.4 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.6 (Dec. 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 4.6

Indiana Unemployment Rate

Indiana has the world's second-largest automotive industry, in addition to being home to the "Orthopedics Capital of the World." Not surprisingly, manufacturing is one of the Hoosier State's most profitable and fastest growing sectors, employing more than 128,800 workers. Mining mineral resources is also a major industry in Indiana, most notably the 36 million tons of coal collected annually.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.8 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.2 (April 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.2

Iowa Unemployment Rate

As one of the two states with the highest concentration of agricultural engineer employment (tied with Nebraska), it's easy to think of Iowa as primarily driven by farming. The Hawkeye State is the largest producer of corn, pork, and eggs in the U.S., producing one-fourteenth of the country's food supply. However, Iowa's biggest industries in terms of employment are actually trade, transportation, and utilities; healthcare and social services; and manufacturing.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 10.5 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.4 (July 2018)
  • Current unemployment: 2.7

Kansas Unemployment Rate

Although healthcare is actually Kansas' biggest sector in terms of employment, manufacturing is right behind it. As the production site of many B-29 and B-52 bombers in the 1940s and 1950s, Kansas remains a powerhouse in Aerospace and Defense industries today. Other prominent industries include biosciences, which employs more than 16,000 people, and renewable energy. Kansas is second in the country for wind energy potential.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 12.2 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.3 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.3

Kentucky Unemployment Rate

Kentucky is the top producer of cars, light trucks, and SUVs per capita; its automotive sector employs more than 100,000 people. That said, the Bluegrass State is probably best known for its bourbon, given that it provides 95% of the world's bourbon supply. However, the food and beverage industry only employs 52,000 people, compared to the 260,000 working in the overall manufacturing sector.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.5 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.8 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 3.8

Louisiana Unemployment Rate

Louisiana's biggest industries are well-suited to its location and its abundant natural resources. The Pelican State is ranked second in crude oil, with more than 90% of U.S. oil rigs located off its coast, and third in natural gas production. Most unique, however, is Louisiana's shipbuilding sector, with many of the ships produced being oil and gas rigs.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 13.5 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.9 (Nov. 2007)
  • Current unemployment: 4.0

Maine Unemployment Rate

The state of Maine is nearly 89% woodland, so it's unsurprising that lumber became a major industry. Although its prominence has diminished somewhat as competition has risen in other parts of the U.S., lumber still accounts for more than 38,000 jobs. Services makes up the biggest industry in the Pine Tree State, followed closely by manufacturing.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 9.2 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.6 (June 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 3.2

Maryland Unemployment Rate

Maryland has a lot to brag about: The Free State is ranked first in median household income in the U.S. and has the longest running AAA rating from S&P Global. Perhaps most impressive is that Maryland's government sector has the highest percentage of employed persons per capita of any state. Maryland also features $55.5 billion military industry, along with $17.7 billion in federal obligations for research and development.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 9.5 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.1 (May 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 4.0

Massachusetts Unemployment Rate

Although Massachusetts was once best known for agriculture and maritime trading, its modern economy revolves heavily around the service industry, in addition to technological research and development. The healthcare and social assistance sector has the highest number of employed persons in the Bay State, at nearly 700,000. The second largest, professional, scientific, and technical service workers are 30% lower than that number.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 17.1 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.7 (Nov. 2000)
  • Current unemployment: 3.9

Michigan Unemployment Rate

Michigan, headquarters state for Ford and Chevrolet, was once a major manufacturing state in terms of employment. Detroit was Motown for cars before it became Motown for music. Although 76% of North American autos are still produced in the Great Lake State, 17% of Michigan's workforce is now in the healthcare sector. Despite all this, manufacturing still remains Michigan's most profitable industry.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 22.7 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.2 (Feb. 2000)
  • Current unemployment: 4.3

Minnesota Unemployment Rate

The manufacturing sector is responsible for the largest portion of Minnesota's GDP, worth roughly $326 billion. The North Star State—home base of the world-famous Mayo Clinic—is ranked first in the U.S. for healthcare, an industry that employs over 500,000 people.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 10.8 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.0 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.0

Mississippi Unemployment Rate

Mississippi's biggest claim to fame is likely its agricultural industry, which employs 17.4% of its population. That being said, the industry in Mississippi with the most employed persons is actually the federal government.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 15.4 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 4.0 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 4.0

Missouri Unemployment Rate

With the 4th most diverse economy in the country, the Show-Me State boasts advancements in everything from biosciences to automotive suppliers to information technology. Along with the sixth best highway system, Missouri also has the largest waterway system, providing opportunities for trade and transportation that much of the country can't match. Missouri is also rated as the best state for banking in the U.S. and is the only state that hosts two federal reserve banks.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 11.2 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.9 (July 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 3.1

Montana Unemployment Rate

Montana's government sector is its biggest employer, followed relatively closely by trade. Despite representing less than 5% of the Treasure State's workforce, the financial services sector is responsible for the largest share of its GDP. Leisure and activities is also a significant industry, which is unsurprising, given the presence of Yellowstone National Park within its borders.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 12.2 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.3 (April 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.4

Nebraska Unemployment Rate

The "breadbasket of the world" is responsible for generating $10.6 billion worth of beef annually—easy to do when your cattle outnumber your citizens by three to one. Nebraska's status as the Cornhusker State is also well earned; it's the third largest producer of corn in the U.S. Even so, the health and medical services sector actually employs the biggest share of the state's workforce.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 8.2 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 1.9 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 1.9

Nevada Unemployment Rate

Although the Silver State may be better known for Las Vegas' casinos, Nevada originally got its start as a major mining hub. That said, the Entertainment Capital of the World is responsible for employing roughly 94% of the state's workforce, with the largest percentage working in the service industry. The next largest sector—knowledge and technology-based industries—only accounts for 19.3%, compared to 77% for the service sector. Nevada achieved the highest state unemployment rate in the country's history in 2020 as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 28.5 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.7 (Aug. 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 4.9

New Hampshire Unemployment Rate

New Hampshire has a long history as a manufacturing state, specifically with the production of paper and grain. As the use of mills began to decline over the 20th century, the Granite State turned to more traditional manufacturing. Although modern manufacturing has become far more high-tech, it still remains the biggest sector of New Hampshire's economy.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.2 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.1 (June 1987)
  • Current unemployment: 2.1

New Jersey Unemployment Rate

New Jersey's biggest industry by employment is healthcare, which has continued to grow ever since 1990. Second is retail trade, which accounts for roughly 13% of the Garden State's workforce, though a significant portion are seasonal or part-time workers.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 15.8 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.2 (June 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 3.9

New Mexico Unemployment Rate

Although New Mexico is no longer thought of as a mining state, the oil and gas industry still pulls in more than $2 billion each year. However, mining only represents a small portion of the workforce, with the government sector actually employing more than the private sector. The federal government has a number of installations in the Land of Enchantment, including the Los Alamos National Laboratory and three Air Force bases.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 10.5 (March 1983)
  • Historic Low: 3.5 (Sept. 2007)
  • Current unemployment: 5.1

New York Unemployment Rate

If you've either visited the Big Apple or called it home, it's easy to think everyone in the U.S. lives there. However, although NYC does have the largest population of any U.S. city, New York itself is only the fourth most populous state. Even so, many significant industries in N.Y.—such as financial services—are based primarily in the Big Apple. Regarding the latter, NYC is the home of Wall Street and the New York Stock Exchange, currently the world's largest stock market.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.5 (May 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.7 (June 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 4.4

North Carolina Unemployment Rate

Formerly an agricultural state, North Carolina's economy was heavily industrialized after the Civil War. Much of this remains the case today. N.C.'s famous furniture manufacturers and High Point Market trade show make it still the "Furniture Capital of the World," and its aerospace industry is built upon the legacy of the Wright brothers. N.C. also features the third largest financial center in the U.S. and the second-fastest growing IT sector in the country.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 14.2 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.1 (March 1999)
  • Current unemployment: 3.4

North Dakota Unemployment Rate

Approximately 90% of North Dakota is made up of farms and ranches, a factor that allows agriculture to be the state's biggest economic contributor and responsible for one-fourth of its workforce. The Roughrider State is one of the few states where the advanced manufacturing sector has grown; most have seen their industry shrink over time.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 8.3 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.0 (Dec. 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 2.6

Ohio Unemployment Rate

Ohio was once the second-largest producer of steel in the U.S. While manufacturing is still a significant employer in the Buckeye State's modern economy, trade, transportation, and utilities currently holds the biggest share of the workforce. Ohio is also among the ranks of states that receives the largest individual share of GDP from the financial services sector.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.4 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.8 (March 2001)
  • Current unemployment: 3.9

Oklahoma Unemployment Rate

Mining makes up the largest share of Oklahoma's GDP, followed by government, finance, and manufacturing. Harvested oil and gas contribute to the Sooner State's energy sector; Oklahoma is the third biggest producer of natural gas in the country. Outside of traditional energy, one-third of Oklahoma's electricity is now generated from renewable sources, such as wind and solar.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 12.6 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.6 (Feb. 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.8

Oregon Unemployment Rate

Oregon is far more dependent on trade that other parts of the U.S., with most of its exports going to other states rather than foreign countries. Private healthcare and social assistance represents the biggest employment sector in the Beaver State. Additionally, Oregon has a larger percentage of its workforce employed in the clean energy sector than any other state.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 13.3 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.4 (Feb. 2020)
  • Current unemployment: 3.6

Pennsylvania Unemployment Rate

Over a sixth of Pennsylvania's population works in healthcare, which makes it the largest employer in the state. The Keystone State's history in the healthcare industry began with the founding of the first hospital in the U.S. Pennsylvania can also be counted among the ranks of states where the financial services sector is the most profitable.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.5 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 4.1 (April 2000)
  • Current unemployment: 4.7

Rhode Island Unemployment Rate

Following the American Revolution, Rhode Island had a prominent manufacturing sector. Deindustrialization eventually led to the decline of manufacturing, which was slowly replaced with a more service-based economy. Healthcare and social assistance is the dominant industry in Rhode Island.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 18.4 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.7 (May 1988)
  • Current unemployment: 2.9

South Carolina Unemployment Rate

Trade, transportation, and utilities make up the largest sector in South Carolina by employment, comprised of more than 430,000 jobs. Despite this, finance, insurance & real estate is the most profitable industry in the Palmetto State, in terms of GDP. While not the largest workforce, manufacturing in South Carolina still accounts for approximately 248,000 employees.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 12.1 (Dec. 2009)
  • Historic Low: 2.4 (Sept. 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 3.3

South Dakota Unemployment Rate

Agricultural production is one of the most prominent sectors in the South Dakota economy, though most of the state's workforce is actually employed in the service industry. At times the tourism industry in the Mount Rushmore State has been nearly equal to to the agriculture sector due to its many notable attractions, including that iconic carved mountain.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 8.8 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.3 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.3

Tennessee Unemployment Rate

As is the case in a couple of other states, Tennessee's biggest employer is the trade, transportation, and utilities sector. Despite this, mining, logging, and construction has actually seen the most job growth in the last few years. The service sector has accounted for more than 50% of GDP—and the most new jobs—in the Volunteer State.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 15.9 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.2 (April 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 3.3

Texas Unemployment Rate

As is probably no surprise, the oil and gas extraction sector is responsible for the largest share of GDP in Texas. The Lone Star State is actually the biggest energy-producer in the country, and it even has its own power grid. All the same, manufacturing employs far more people than the traditional energy industry, at approximately 917,800.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 12.6 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.4 (Jan. 2020)
  • Current unemployment: 4.3

Utah Unemployment Rate

The trade, transportation, and utilities industries make up the largest share of the workforce, though the government sector is close behind. The Beehive State has a rather diverse economy; it was formerly driven by agriculture, but this began to shrink during the 20th century. Meanwhile, government and tourism continue to rise faster than other industries in Utah's economy.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 10.0 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 1.9 (April 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.0

Vermont Unemployment Rate

Vermont's major employer is the agricultural sector. Over three-fourths of the Green Mountain State's farm income is derived from dairy products, even though less than half of its agricultural sector is actually comprised of dairy farms. As is often the case, the financial services sector is responsible for the largest share of Vermont's GDP.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 14.3 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.1 (May 2019)
  • Current unemployment: 2.3

Virginia Unemployment Rate

Virginia's diverse geography has allowed a wide variety of key industries to crop up. The Mother of States features the largest data center market in the U.S., the third-largest port on the East Coast, and the second-highest concentration of tech workers in the country. In 2000, Virginia reached the lowest state unemployment rate in U.S. history.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 11.6 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.1 (Nov. 2000)
  • Current unemployment: 3.0

Washington Unemployment Rate

The birthplace of Amazon and Microsoft has the highest share of its workforce in the information and communication technology sector. The Evergreen State's second largest industry is military and defense, and it has the sixth largest number of active duty personnel. Even so, the information sector still makes up the biggest share of Washington's GDP.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 16.8 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 3.9 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 3.9

West Virginia Unemployment Rate

Following the Reconstruction Era, West Virginia's economy revolved heavily around its abundant natural resources and growing extraction industry. Coal had a particularly prominent place in the early West Virginian economy, and the state remains the second-largest coal producer in the U.S. In 1983, West Virginia reached the highest state unemployment rate in the country's history, prior to the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 18.4 (March 1983)
  • Historic Low: 3.5 (May 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 3.5

Wisconsin Unemployment Rate

Trade, transportation, and utilities is the biggest employer in Wisconsin, with manufacturing fairly close behind it. Eighty-six percent of the Badger State's exports are manufactured goods, supporting 103,000 jobs, according to the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation. Although manufacturing is also responsible for the largest percentage of the state's GDP, financial services is close behind.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 14.1 (April 2020)
  • Historic Low: 2.8 (April 2022)
  • Current unemployment: 2.9

Wyoming Unemployment Rate

Wyoming is another state where natural resources play a critical role, making mining one of its key industries. The Equality State also pulls in a noteworthy amount of revenue from tourism, thanks to its many national parks. Wyoming is currently the least populous state in the country.

  • Unemployment Historic High/Low:
  • Historic High: 9.1 (Jan. 1987)
  • Historic Low: 2.3 (May 1979)
  • Current unemployment: 3.2

What Do Unemployment Rates Tell Us?

The unemployment rate measures what percent of the labor force is out of work. However, it is a lagging indicator. It rises or falls based on changing economic conditions and is not a forward-looking indicator.

What Happens if the Unemployment Rate Is High?

High unemployment rates suggest the economy is not creating or supporting enough jobs for people willing to work.

How Does Unemployment Rate Affect Everyone?

The unemployment rate, if high, suggests individuals are having a difficult time finding jobs. Unemployment can negatively affect the economy and households. Specially, purchasing power and disposable income will decline. This can put negative pressure on the economy and lead to consumer spending reductions and decreased output by companies.

Article Sources
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