1. Introduction to Commodities
  2. Commodities: Cocoa
  3. Commodities: Coffee
  4. Commodities: Copper
  5. Commodities: Corn
  6. Commodities: Cotton
  7. Commodities: Crude Oil
  8. Commodities: Feeder Cattle
  9. Commodities: Gold
  10. Commodities: Heating Oil
  11. Commodities: Live Cattle
  12. Commodities: Lumber
  13. Commodities: Natural Gas
  14. Commodities: Oats
  15. Commodities: Orange Juice
  16. Commodities: Platinum
  17. Commodities: Rough Rice
  18. Commodities: Silver
  19. Commodities: Soybeans and Soybean Oil
  20. Commodities: Sugar
  21. Commodities: Wheat
  22. Understanding Commodities Trading

Prior to 1945, orange juice was always freshly-squeezed – something that left the commercial orange juice industry susceptible to supply shocks due to the highly perishable nature of the juice. The invention of frozen concentrated orange juice (FCOJ) in 1945 – and the increase in home refrigerators – opened the gates to an international marketplace. Frozen concentrate remained the most popular form of juice until 1985, when reconstituted and not-from-concentrate juices overtook the frozen type.

Contract Specifications

Ticker Symbol


Contract Size

15,000 pounds of orange juice solids (3% or less)

Contract Months

F, H, K, N, U, X

Trading Hours

ICE: Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Last Trading Day

The 14th business day prior to the last business day of the contract month

Price Quote

U.S. dollars and cents per pound

Tick Size

$0.0005 per pound ($7.50 per contract)


Typically, orange trees take about four years to bear fruit and eight years to reach their prime. Trees can remain productive for 20 to 25 years. Brazil and the U.S. are the world’s largest producers of orange juice (Brazil surpassed Florida as the dominant producer years ago), followed by Mexico, the European Union, China and South Africa.

Price Drivers

One reason Brazil was able to overtake the U.S. as the top orange juice producer is weather: Florida’s frosts and hurricanes can result in lower outputs and reduced long-term productivity of the trees. Factors that influence orange juice prices include:

  • weather, especially cold/frost
  • shipping and production costs
  • food-safety concerns (such as when Brazil’s orange juice supplies were tainted with fungicide)



Commodities: Platinum
Related Articles
  1. Trading

    How To Trade Orange Juice Options

    How do orange juice options work and which factors determine the orange juice valuations? Here's a sneak peak into the world of orange juice options.
  2. Investing

    Trading The Soft Commodity Markets

    Learn the contract specifications for a few of the most heavily traded commodities.
  3. Investing

    Whole Foods Want to Celebrate Good (Food) Times

    The expanded food holiday celebrations is likely to drive traffic and improve sales.
  4. Investing

    Big Data is Helping Coke with Product Development

    The launch of Sprite Cherry is just another instance of Coke using big data to up its business.
  5. Insights

    Florida's Economy: The 6 Industries Driving GDP Growth

    Learn how tourism, agriculture, international trade, aerospace and aviation, and the life sciences industries drive Florida's economy.
  6. Investing

    The Role Of Speculators In The Commodity Market

    Contrary to popular belief, speculators are important for the market. Find out exactly what they do.
  7. Investing

    Focus on Economic Growth and Inflation When Investing

    Don't get distracted by the headlines, focus on economic growth and inflation when investing.
  8. Taxes

    How Soda Taxes Will Affect PepsiCo and Coca-Cola

    Discover how a soda tax could affect the Coca-Cola Company and Pepsico, Inc., and see how both companies have expanded their product offerings in response.
Frequently Asked Questions
  1. Interest Rate Risk Between Long-Term and Short-Term Bonds

    Find out the differences and effects of Interest rates between Long-term and short-term bonds. Read how interest rate risk ...
  2. How Are Dividends Pay from Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) ?

    Learn how Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) pay out the full dividend that comes with stocks held within the fund. Understand ...
  3. Who are Walt Disney's main competitors?

    Learn about how creating entertainment has been Walt Disney's niche since the 1920s, even as it faces ever-increasing competition ...
  4. Knowing the difference between EE and I bonds

    Read about the similarities and differences between the EE saving bonds and I savings bond programs created by the U.S. Department ...
Trading Center