1. Inflation: Introduction
  2. Inflation: What Is Inflation?
  3. Inflation: How Is It Measured?
  4. Inflation: Inflation And Interest Rates
  5. Inflation: Inflation And Investments
  6. Inflation: Conclusion

After reading this tutorial, you should have some insight into inflation and its effects. For starters, you now know that inflation isn't intrinsically good or bad. Like so many things in life, the impact of inflation depends on your personal situation.

Some points to remember:

  • Inflation is a sustained increase in the general level of prices for goods and services.
  • When inflation goes up, there is a decline in the value, or purchasing power of money.
  • Variations on inflation include disinflation​, deflation, hyperinflation and stagflation.
  • Theories as to the cause of inflation are up for debate. Some common theories include demand-pull inflation, cost-push inflation, and monetary inflation.
  • When there is unanticipated inflation, creditors lose, people on a fixed-income lose, menu costs go up, uncertainty reduces spending and exporters aren't as competitive.
  • Lack of inflation (or deflation) is not necessarily a good thing and can lead to destabilizing deflationary spirals.
  • Inflation is measured with a price index.
  • The two main groups of price indexes that measure inflation are the Consumer Price Index and the Producer Price Indexes. The GDP- and Price-deflator are also used.
  • Interest rates are decided in the U.S. by the Federal Reserve. Inflation plays a large role in the Fed's decisions regarding interest rates since it uses inflation-targeting as a policy.
  • In the long term, stocks and precious metals are good protection against inflation.
  • Inflation is a serious problem for fixed income investors. It's important to understand the difference between nominal interest rates and real interest rates.
  • Inflation-indexed securities offer protection against inflation but offer low returns.

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Frequently Asked Questions
  1. What Was the First Company to Issue Stock?

    The Dutch East India Co. held an IPO in 1602, making it the first company to issue stock.
  2. When Does a Corporation Decide to Refinance Debt?

    Favorable market conditions or the strengthening of a credit rating may lead to refinancing.
  3. What Is an Odd-Lot Buyback?

    Odd-lot buybacks involve lots of less than 100 shares. Learn how companies get these shares back.
  4. Can I buy a house directly from Fannie Mae (FNMA)?

    Yes, Fannie Mae does sell properties it's foreclosed on; each property is sold in "as is" condition.
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