1. Intro to Insurance: Introduction
  2. Intro to Insurance: What Is Insurance?
  3. Intro to Insurance: Fundamentals of Insurance
  4. Intro to Insurance: Property and Casualty Insurance
  5. Intro to Insurance: Health Insurance
  6. Intro to Insurance: Disability Insurance
  7. Intro to Insurance: Long-Term Care Insurance
  8. Intro to Insurance: Life Insurance
  9. Intro to Insurance: Types of Life Insurance
  10. Intro to Insurance: Life Insurance Considerations
  11. Intro to Insurance: Other Insurance Policies
  12. Intro to Insurance: Conclusion

If you want to drive a car or take out a mortgage to buy a house, you’ll be required to buy insurance. Insurance protects both you and others from calamity and makes it possible to take risks that would otherwise be too great. If you want to drive a car or take out a mortgage to buy a house, you’ll be required to buy insurance. Insurance protects both you and others from calamity and makes it possible to take risks that would otherwise be too great. Lenders could not afford to advance us hundreds of thousands of dollars to buy a home if they knew that if the home burned down, we would simply walk away and stop paying our mortgage because few of us would have the savings to rebuild our homes. And getting into a car accident without insurance would potentially leave the drivers of all the involved vehicles without a way to get to work and with no money to pay for medical treatment.

Insurance also keeps us alive and healthy by making healthcare more affordable, gives us a means to provide for our loved ones after our death, and lets us keep drawing an income even if we can’t work for months or years due to illness or injury.

While most of us buy the insurance we’re required to, we don’t always buy the optional insurance that could make us more financially secure and alleviate some of our anxiety about the bad luck that might befall us. What’s more, few of us have a good understanding of how our insurance policies actually work. And we should, because we pay a lot for them – more than $1,100 per year for homeowners insurance and more than $800 a year for auto insurance, per vehicle. Lacking this, we can’t take full advantage of our policies’ benefits or make the best choices about how much coverage to purchase without that understanding.

This tutorial will get you up to speed on the basics of how all insurance works, as well as the specifics of the most common types of insurance that individuals buy: homeowners and renters insurance, health insurance, disability insurance, long-term care insurance, life insurance and a few other types, as well.  


Intro to Insurance: What Is Insurance?
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