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In statistics, mutually exclusive situations involve the occurrence of one event that does not influence or cause another event.

For example, two rolls of one die are mutually exclusive events because one roll’s result has no impact on the next roll.

Mutually exclusive events cannot occur simultaneously. For example, a car driver could not turn left and right at the same time. However, they could turn right and sing at the same time.

Knowing whether two events are mutually exclusive can help calculate the probability they will occur.

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