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Corporate Social Responsibility refers to a code of conduct and action beyond what is required by laws, regulations and trade rules.

Corporate social responsibility can be anything from a corporation taking steps to operate in a clean, ecologically friendly way, to social and ethical educational programs for its employees, to various charitable endeavors and community involvement.

Besides creating goodwill, does social responsibility help the corporation’s bottom line? Perhaps. Creating a positive attitude toward the company might lead to increased sales, loyal customers and external interest in the company's stock.

However, some say it has a negative effect. They argue that the only responsibility a corporation should have is to obey all laws and operate to maximize profits for shareholders.  Doing anything to the contrary is a distraction from the lawful maximization of profits. 

Still, most corporations have some form of corporate social responsibility as part of their operations, and many would agree that society tends to benefit from a kinder, gentler approach to social impact by major corporations.

GoodCoffee Corp is a coffee house based in a country with no restrictions on imports. GoodCoffee chooses between importing from two countries, evil-land and fair-land. While evil-land offers its coffee at a cheaper price, they are known for mistreating and exploiting their coffee farmers. Fair-land on the other hand, is known for having a fair and well established coffee farming industry, and for giving high quality benefits to its coffee farmers. Because GoodCoffee Corp practices corporate responsibility regarding countries not treating their farmers fairly, they choose to only import the more expensive but responsibly sourced coffee from fair-land. 

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